We have added 18 new currencies!


Apple recently announced that they are expanding their online application stores to 32 new countries and territories (the announcement can be found here).  We have coverage for all countries with an App Store on it, so we recently added the following 18 currencies:

The lek (Albanian: Leku Shqiptar; plural lekë; code: ALL) is the official currency of Albania. It is subdivided into 100 qindarka (singular qindarkë), although qindarka are no longer issued.

The ngultrum (code: BTN; Dzongkha: དངུལ་ཀྲམ) has been the currency of Bhutan since 1974. It is subdivided into 100 chhertum (called chetrums on coins until 1979).

The escudo (code: CVE) is the currency of the Republic of Cape Verde. Amounts are generally written by using the cifrão as the decimal separator, such as 20$00 for 20 escudos, or 1.000$00 for 1000.

The som (Kyrgyz: сом, sometimes transliterated as “sum” or “soum”; code: KGS) is the currency of the Kyrgyz Republic in Central Asia. The som is sub-divided into 100 tyiyn (Kyrgyz: тыйын). The som was introduced on May 10, 1993, replacing the Soviet ruble at a rate of 1 som = 200 rubles.

The kip (Lao: ກີບ; code: LAK; sign: ₭ or ₭N; Official Name: ເງີນກີບລາວ, lit. “Currency Lao Kip”) is the currency of Laos since 1952. One kip is divided into 100 att (ອັດ).

The kwacha (code: MWK) is the currency of Malawi as of 1971, replacing the Malawian pound. It is divided into 100 tambala. The kwacha replaced other types of currency, namely the UK pound sterling, the South African rand and the Rhodesian dollar.

The ouguiya (sign: UM; Arabic: أوقية‎; code: MRO), also spelt “ougiya”, is the currency of Mauritania. Each ouguiya comprising five khoums (singular and plural in English, Arabic: خمس‎, meaning “one fifth”).

The tögrög or tugrik (Mongolian: төгрөг, tögrög) (sign: ₮; code: MNT) is the official currency of Mongolia. It was historically subdivided into 100 möngö (мөнгө). Currently the lowest denomination in regular use is the 10-tögrög note and the highest is the 20,000-tögrög note.

The dollar (code: NAD) has been the currency of Namibia since 1993. It is normally abbreviated with the dollar sign $, or alternatively N$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. It is divided into 100 cents.

The leone is the currency of Sierra Leone. It is subdivided into 100 cents (code: SLL).  The leone is abbreviated as Le placed before the amount.
 

The lilangeni (plural: emalangeni, code: SZL) is the currency of Swaziland and is subdivided into 100 cents. It is issued by the Central Bank of Swaziland (in swazi Umntsholi Wemaswati).

The somoni (Tajik: cомонӣ, code: TJS) is the currency of Tajikistan. It is subdivided into 100 diram (Tajik: дирам). The currency is named after the father of the Tajik nation, Ismail Samani (also spelled Ismoil Somoni).

The Manat is the currency of Turkmenistan. It was introduced on October 1993, replacing the Russian ruble at a rate of 1 manat = 500 ruble. The code was TMM and the manat is subdivided into 100 tenge. On 2009 the new manat was introduced with code TMT at the rate of 5000 old manat to 1 new manat.

The dalasi (code: GMD) is the currency of the Gambia. It is subdivided into 100 bututs. The dalasi was adopted in 1971. It replaced the Gambian pound at a rate of 1 pound = 5 dalasi, i.e., 1 dalasi = 0.2 pound = 4 shillings.

The rupee is the currency of the Seychelles. It is subdivided into 100 cents. In the local Seychellois Creole (Seselwa) language, it is called the roupi. The international currency code is SCR. The abbreviations SR and SRe are sometimes used.

The dobra (code: STD) is the currency of São Tomé and Príncipe. It is abbreviated Db and is divided into 100 cêntimos, although inflation has rendered the cêntimo obsolete. The dobra was introduced in 1977, replacing the Portuguese Escudo at par.

The dollar (code: SBD) is the currency of the Solomon Islands since 1977. It is normally abbreviated with the dollar sign “$” or, alternatively “SI$” to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. It is subdivided into 100 cents.

The dollar (code LRD) has been the currency of Liberia since 1943. It was also the country’s currency between 1847 and 1907. It is normally abbreviated with the dollar sign $, or alternatively L$ or LD$ to distinguish it from other dollar-denominated currencies. It is divided into 100 cents.

The other 15 countries that are receiving an App Store were already supported by our applications.  You will be able to see all these currencies with their flags next time you launch the applications.

Best regards from the Limited Securities team.

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iCurrency Plus for iPhone updated to v1.2.9


We have updated iCurrency Plus for iPhone to v1.2.9. This updated addresses three main issues:

  • In v1.2.8, we introduced a bug where a few users were seen messages saying that the installation was illegal. While the message is annoying, the application never stopped working; we have fixed the bug now.
  • Completely deprecates the use of UDID as requested by Apple. UDID stands for Unique Device ID and now we have completely moved to Unique Application ID (UAID). We need this ID to identify you in our servers in order to be able to send you customized push notifications. None of your personal details are sent to us, just a unique ID.
  • iOS 6 Ready!

We have a few major enhancements in the pipeline, but in the mean while this update is mandatory. Current version (v1.2.8) of iCurrency Plus for iPhone will stop working soon. Best regards from the Limited Securities Team!